Thursday, August 10, 2017

Cover Reveal: Turning the Tide

Edith Maxwell here, thoroughly enjoying the plentiful fresh produce of a New England August.


I'm so excited I can finally reveal the cover for the third Quaker Midwife Mystery, Turning the Tide! To celebrate, I'm going to give away a large-print edition of Called to Justice to one commenter here today.

Here's the blurb for Turning the Tide

Excitement runs high during Presidential election week in 1888. The Woman Suffrage Association plans a demonstration, and movement leader Elizabeth Cady Stanton comes to town to rally the troops. When Quaker midwife Rose Carroll finds the body of the group's local organizer the next morning, she can't help but wonder who could have committed the murder.


Rose quickly discovers several people who have motives. The victim had planned to leave her controlling husband, and a recent promotion had cost a male colleague his job. She had also recently spurned a fellow suffragist's affections. After Rose's own life is threatened, identifying the killer takes on a personal sense of urgency.
I wrote about some of my research for the book here last month, and finally I can share the cover. Are you ready? Drumroll please...



The women turn out in force to demonstrate across from the polls on election morning - see them behind Rose? The book will be out next April, and is available for preorder (which, you know, really helps authors - just saying...).

Readers: Do you have any family connections with woman suffrage activists? What other novels do you like that deal with the topic, whether in the nineteenth century or the twentieth?

Edith Maxwell writes the Quaker Midwife Mysteries, the Local Foods Mysteries, and award-winning, Agatha-nominated short crime fiction. As Maddie Day she creates the Country Store Mysteries and the Cozy Capers Book Group Mysteries.

Maxwell is President of Sisters in Crime New England. She lives north of Boston with her beau and three cats, and blogs here, with the other Wicked Cozy Authors, and with the Midnight Ink Writers. You can find her on Facebook, twitter, Pinterest, and at her web site, edithmaxwell.com.

12 comments:

Sara E. Campbell said...

Oooh, I've been doing some suffragist research. This looks good!

Kay Garrett said...

Awesome cover and I know the book is just as much so!

Sue Leis said...

I don't have any family connections to ant suffragettes that I know of. I belong to a book club at my local library and we read Sue Monk Kidd's The Invention of Wings earlier this year. It is based on the life of Sarah Grimke, an abolitionist and early supporter of women's rights. Many in the abolition movement didn't want to link their cause to women's rights, as Sarah and her sister Angelina did. It is a fascinating story and I highly recommend it. I learned a great deal and it spurred me on to learn ore about both abolition and women's suffrage.

This book looks wonderful too.

Daniele K said...

I don't have any ties to the suffrage movement that I know of. I read bits here and there but don't know as much as I should. Thank you for the chance to win. My mother is near blind, and I would love to share this with her. Dmskrug3(at)hotmail(doy)com

Patti Phillips said...

What a terrific theme for "Turning the Tide." I look forward to reading about Rose's efforts to advance the cause of women's rights, both voting and otherwise. We, in this country, are so very lucky to have made the strides we have, but much more should be done. Bravo, Edith!

Celia Fowler said...

My Aunt was always politically active, and I've no doubt that she would have be a suffragist. I can picture her wearing the sashes and marching with other women to make sure that all women were treated equally.

Judi said...

I've never been told anything about my family members working for suffrage but they were probably too busy on the farm! I'm sure in their hearts though the women wanted their voices to be heard. Now I can't wait to find out how Rose will get involved.

MaryAnn Forbes said...

I don't personally have any connections to the suffragette movement. I admire these sisters who so bravely paved the way fo so many of us.
I am looking forward to reading Turning the Tide-- Rose is one of my favorite fictional characters.

Gram said...

I'm sure I had no connection as my ancestors worked their farms in NH and in mills around Lowell. Large print iis restful to these old eyes when I read at night in bed.

Cathi said...

I don't have any relatives that were members of the suffragette movement as far as I know. I haven't read any books specifically about suffragettes but I have read about midwives. Being a midwife was a dream of mine many years ago but was not meant to be. Thank you for the opportunity to win a copy!

Rosemarie said...

In a more modern vein, I'm a product of Title 9 (1970s). I was the first woman to graduate with a degree in Chemistry/Physics from a historically male school (Georgetown). Women in science in the 1970s to 1990s fought as hard as the suffragettes for equality in science.

I write historical mysteries around 1910 to 1920. In my first mystery, "Enemey Fire" my heroine is presented with a prophetic remembrance of death during the suffragette movement in chapter 1. I expect that I will have a future book that deals with suffragettes.

Edith Maxwell said...

Sara E. Campbell is the winner! Sara, please send your mailing address to edith at edithmaxwell dot com. Congratulations, and I wish I had a book to send every commenter.